Knowledge Management

An increasing number of UN Country Teams and Humanitarian Country Teams in the field as well as headquarters’ UN agencies, international Finance Institutions such as the World Bank and national governments are expressing or reasserting their interest in strengthening the linkages between humanitarian and development interventions, including under the New Way of Working. Multi-year planning of humanitarian response is already being increasingly adopted to encourage more sustainable results and, where possible, facilitate the transition between short and longer term programmes and eventually reduce the former. Few of these multi-year humanitarian plans have been based on a solid analysis that builds on past trends and brings in contextual information typically found in development analyses. Experiences with joint analysis between humanitarian and development actors are not documented, thus limiting lesson learning.

This provisional guidance note is an attempt to assist OCHA Country Offices with facilitating and supporting joint analysis between humanitarian and development actors when appropriate. Reflecting the paucity of concrete examples of practical ways to arrange for and undertake joint analysis, the guidance is admittedly still conceptual rather than grounded in proven experience, but is an attempt to suggest workable steps that can be applied and adapted to each field context.
Life cycle steps

The Joint Intersectoral Analysis Group (JIAG) commenced work focusing on 2 pillars:


Refinement or development of methods and tools
Conduct of joint inter-sectoral analyses in crisis contexts.


Key to Pillar 1 is the development of an analytical model for inter-sectoral analysis, to assist with the identification of inter-linkages between various factors and sectors resulting in given outcomes for the lives and livelihoods of crisis-affected people. This model should have a foundation in current best practices in needs analysis and adapted to address requirements across all sectors.
In order to build this foundation, existing analysis frameworks must be reviewed, analysed and compared. The results of the review will then be used for developing an analysis framework for inter-sectoral understanding of needs and the factors related to needs.
Life cycle steps

Humanitarian programme cycle (HPC) analysis and planning are currently mostly executed as a “one-off” exercise mostly during the third quarter of the year. This is problematic for various reasons:


The process has become too product-focused, driven by the drafting of Humanitarian NeedsOverview (HNO) and Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) documents that eventually enable theproduction of the annual Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO), which is important to fund-raising efforts.
It is resource-intensive, requiring significant staff time from OCHA and partners.
It results in a snapshot of needs and response priorities that become often quickly out of date, asthe situation evolves.


More regular updates of humanitarian needs and response progress and gaps should help address these issues by consolidating and analysing information and data throughout the year, as required, with the aim to inform more timely and relevant response decisions by the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT). There is nothing new in this concept, as monitoring has been an integral part of the HPC since its inception with the Transformative Agenda in 2011. However, its implementation has proven elusive, including because of the heavy focus on the yearly HNO and HRP outputs.
Context
Rural
Urban

A summary document, taken from UNHCR Needs Assessment handbook, about diffrerent types of needs assessment (initial, rapid and in-depth) and their respective methodologies. 
Context
Rural
Urban
Life cycle steps
Population types
All affected population

This guidance/tip sheet is elaborated as a follow up to the Principal’s decision on improving HRP costing in July 2017. This is a living document that will be updated as more knowledge and experience of costing is gathered. In particular, the cluster-specific guidance part will be updated whenever relevant information is provided by the GCCs.

Common Operational Datasets (CODs) are authoritative reference datasets needed to support operations and decision-making for all actors in a humanitarian response. CODs are 'best available' datasets that ensure consistency and simplify the discovery and exchange of key data. Core CODs are required in all disaster-prone countries as a preparedness measure, including administrative boundaries (COD-AB), sex and age-disaggregated population data (COD-PS), and humanitarian profile (caseload)(COD-HP).

Please visit CODs section on OCHA IM Toolbox for more guidance. 
Context
Rural
Urban
Life cycle steps
Population types
All affected population

Multi-year planning is typically undertaken when:


a crisis situation is progressing towards resolution, or
a crisis situation is “frozen”.


In both cases, a reasonable degree of confidence on how the situation will evolve in the next 2-3 years can be achieved1. This does not preclude pockets of higher volatility in a given country or area, or unexpected changes in the situation. Ways to address these events can be integrated in the assessment and analysis approach for multi-year planning.